HomeTripod Weight CapacityHeavy Duty TripodsUnderstanding Weight Capacities of Heavy-Duty Tripods

Understanding Weight Capacities of Heavy-Duty Tripods

When it comes to photography or videography, having a stable and sturdy tripod is crucial for obtaining great results. However, not all tripods are created equal, and choosing the right one for your needs can be perplexing. One important consideration is the weight capacity of the tripod. This refers to the maximum weight the tripod can support without compromising stability and safety. In this article, we will delve into the factors that affect weight capacity, how to determine the weight capacity you need, and tips for getting the most out of your heavy-duty tripod. Let’s explore why weight capacity matters and how to choose the right tripod for your camera and gear.

Why weight capacity matters

Why Weight Capacity Matters
When you’re out shooting with your camera and gear, you want to ensure that you’re capturing the best possible images. One important factor to consider when setting up your shot is the weight capacity of your tripod. It’s essential to have a tripod that can support the weight of your camera and all accessories, but it’s not just about preventing collapse. In this section, let’s discuss why weight capacity matters beyond just keeping your equipment safe and secure. Understanding these reasons can help you make better decisions when choosing the right tripod for your needs. For instance, if you’re looking for a tripod that will work best while shooting wildlife, check out our guide on choosing the right heavy-duty tripod for wildlife photography.

Supporting your camera and gear

A heavy-duty tripod is an essential piece of equipment for any photographer or videographer who wants to ensure a stable base for their camera and gear. The weight capacity of a tripod is a crucial factor in its ability to provide the stability your camera needs. If you overload your tripod, you’ll risk damaging your equipment, getting shaky footage or photos, or worse, having your gear fall over.

Let’s take a closer look at how the weight capacity of your tripod affects supporting your camera and gear:

Strong tripod legs can support heavy loads Weak tripod legs can result in vibrations and camera shake
Heavy-duty tripods provide reliable support for larger cameras, lenses, and accessories. They are designed to hold more weight, providing a stable shooting platform. When looking for a tripod to support your gear, consider the material of the tripod legs and center column, as well as the size and thickness of the legs. If you exceed the weight capacity of your tripod, it may cause the legs to wobble, resulting in shaky footage or photos. The vibrations can be even worse if you’re shooting in windy conditions or on an unstable surface. That’s why it’s essential to choose a tripod with a weight capacity that matches your gear.
To ensure your heavy-duty tripod can support your camera and gear, look for a tripod that can support at least 30% more weight than your heaviest setup. If you shoot with heavy gear, it’s crucial to invest in a heavy-duty tripod with a weight capacity that can support your accessories without destabilizing the setup.

The weight capacity of your tripod is important to provide a stable base for your camera and gear. If you need more information about heavy-duty tripods, check out our top 5 heavy-duty tripods article. Additionally, if you want to learn more about the differences between carbon and aluminum tripods, read our article on heavy-duty tripods: carbon vs aluminum. Finally, if you specialize in astrophotography, you might find our article on choosing the right heavy-duty tripod for astrophotography helpful.

Preventing vibrations and camera shake

When it comes to capturing high-quality photos and videos, preventing vibrations and camera shake is crucial. Even the slightest movement can result in blurry or distorted images. Heavy duty tripods are designed to provide stability and prevent camera shake by keeping your camera and gear steady. Here are some key points to keep in mind:

  • Select a tripod with a low center of gravity – This will reduce the chances of the tripod tipping over or being easily affected by wind or vibrations. Tripods with a wider stance or thicker legs tend to provide more stability.
  • Use a tripod with a sturdy center column – A center column that flexes or wobbles can greatly reduce the stability of your tripod. Choose a heavy duty tripod with a center column that is firmly attached and does not move or vibrate easily.
  • Choose a tripod head that securely holds your camera – The tripod head is the part of the tripod that attaches to your camera. It’s important to choose a head that can securely hold the weight of your camera and gear. A head that moves or shifts can cause your camera to shake or move, resulting in blurry or distorted images.
  • Avoid touching your camera or tripod during exposure – Once your camera is set up on the tripod, try not to touch it or the tripod until the exposure is complete. Any movement, no matter how small, can cause camera shake and affect the final image.
  • Use a remote shutter release – A remote shutter release allows you to trigger the shutter on your camera without physically touching it. This further reduces the chances of camera shake and ensures that your images are sharp and clear.

By taking these steps and choosing a heavy duty tripod with a high weight capacity, you can greatly reduce vibrations and camera shake and capture stunning, high-quality photos and videos.

Factors that affect weight capacity

Factors That Affect Weight Capacity
When it comes to heavy-duty tripods, weight capacity is one of the most important factors to consider. The weight capacity of a tripod refers to the maximum weight it can support without compromising stability or safety. This, in turn, affects the type and size of the camera and gear you can use with the tripod, making it important to understand the factors that affect weight capacity. Factors such as the material of the tripod legs and center column, the size and thickness of tripod legs, and the type of tripod head are all crucial to determining the weight capacity of a tripod. Let’s take a closer look at each of these factors to understand how they affect weight capacity.

Material of tripod legs and center column

The material of the tripod legs and center column plays a crucial role in determining the weight capacity of heavy-duty tripods. Different materials have varying levels of durability, strength, and weight, which can directly affect the maximum load they can support. Here are some materials commonly used in tripod construction and their characteristics:

Material Strength Durability Weight
Carbon fiber High High Lightweight
Aluminum Moderate Moderate Medium
Steel High High Heavy

Carbon fiber is a popular material for modern tripods as it offers a high strength-to-weight ratio. This means that it can support heavy loads while still being lightweight and easy to move around. Carbon fiber is also resistant to corrosion and a wide range of weather conditions, making it a great choice for outdoor use.

Aluminum is another common material used for tripod legs and center columns. It is moderately strong and durable and can withstand a decent amount of wear and tear. It is also lighter in weight than steel, which makes it easier to transport.

Steel is the strongest and most durable material used for tripods, but it is also the heaviest. Steel tripods are ideal for large and heavy equipment, such as video cameras or telescopes, that require maximum stability and support.

It is important to note that the material alone does not determine the weight capacity of a tripod. Other factors like the size and thickness of the legs and the type of tripod head used also contribute to overall strength and stability.

Size and thickness of tripod legs

The size and thickness of the tripod legs play a crucial role in determining the weight capacity of a heavy-duty tripod. The thickness of the legs affects the stability of the tripod while the size of the legs determines how far the tripod can extend. A tripod with thicker legs provides more stability, while a tripod with longer legs can extend to a greater height.

The table below describes how the size and thickness of the legs affect the tripod’s weight capacity:

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Small Size Medium Size Large Size
Diameter (mm) Weight Capacity (lbs) Diameter (mm) Weight Capacity (lbs) Diameter (mm) Weight Capacity (lbs)
Aluminum Legs 25 22 28 33 32 44
Carbon Fiber Legs 22 26 25 39 28 55

As shown in the table, tripods with larger diameters provide higher weight capacity. For example, a tripod with small size and aluminum legs with a diameter of 25mm can support up to 22lbs of weight, while a tripod with a large size and carbon fiber legs with a diameter of 28mm can support up to 55lbs of weight.

It is important to note that a tripod’s weight capacity is not solely dependent on the size and thickness of the legs. Other factors such as the material and type of tripod head can also affect the weight capacity. When choosing a heavy-duty tripod, it is important to consider all these factors to ensure that the tripod can support the weight of your camera and gear.

Type of tripod head

One of the factors that affect weight capacity is the type of tripod head that you’re using. The tripod head is the part that connects your camera to the tripod, and it comes in different types, each with its own weight capacity.

Ball Head: This type of tripod head is the most popular among photographers. It features a ball and socket mechanism that allows for 360-degree rotation and tilt in all directions. Ball heads are relatively lightweight, but they have lower weight capacities compared to other types of heads. They are ideal for light to medium weight cameras and lenses.

3-Way Pan/Tilt Head: This type of tripod head has three separate locking mechanisms for tilting, panning, and rotating. It offers more precise movements and is great for photographers who need a high level of control. 3-way heads are heavier and have higher weight capacities compared to ball heads, making them great for heavy cameras and lenses.

Gimbal Head: A gimbal head is designed for use with large telephoto lenses. It offers smooth movement and the ability to balance heavy lenses. Gimbal heads are relatively heavy but have higher weight capacities than other types of heads.

Fluid Head: Fluid heads are commonly used for video recording. They offer smooth and fluid movement and are designed to support heavy video cameras. They are also suitable for photographers who need precise control over their movements. Fluid heads are generally the heaviest and have the highest weight capacities of all tripod heads.

When choosing a tripod head, make sure to consider the weight of your camera and lens combination to ensure that it’s suitable for the type of head you wish to use.

How to determine the weight capacity you need

How To Determine The Weight Capacity You Need
Once you have an understanding of why weight capacity is essential when selecting a heavy-duty tripod, the next step is to determine the weight capacity you need for your particular setup. This can be a confusing task, as it involves calculating the weight of your camera and all other equipment you plan to use with the tripod. However, it is crucial to get an accurate estimation of the weight capacity you require to ensure that your tripod can support your gear safely and effectively. In this section, we will discuss the steps to determine the weight capacity you need for your heavy-duty tripod.

Weigh your heaviest gear

Before determining the weight capacity you need for your heavy-duty tripod, the first step is to weigh your heaviest gear. This includes your camera, lens, and any other accessories that you plan to attach to the tripod. Keep in mind that the weight of your gear may vary depending on the shoot and the combinations you use.

To ensure accuracy, use a digital scale that can measure in grams or kilograms. It’s important to be as precise as possible as even a slight difference in weight can impact the stability of your tripod.

Once you have the weight of your heaviest gear, write it down for reference. This will be the baseline when determining the weight capacity you need for your tripod.

Some additional items you may want to weigh include external flashes, battery packs, and any other accessories that you attach to your camera. These may seem like small items, but they can add up quickly and affect the overall weight of your camera setup.

Keep in mind that some elements of your gear may not be fully supported by the tripod. For example, if you use a long lens, it may extend beyond the mount and put additional stress on the tripod. In these cases, you may need to consider additional support options such as lens collars or longer plates on the tripod head.

By weighing your heaviest gear, you can better understand the weight capacity you need for your tripod and ensure that it can support your equipment safely and securely.

Consider the weight of your camera and lens

When determining the weight capacity that you need in a heavy-duty tripod, you must take into consideration the weight of your camera and lens. A heavy camera setup can put a significant strain on a tripod, and choosing one with insufficient weight capacity can result in instability and potential damage to your equipment.

To ensure that you select a tripod with the appropriate weight capacity for your camera, you should start by making a list of all the gear that you typically use. This can include your camera body, lenses, and any additional accessories such as flashes or battery grips.

Next, weigh each item individually and record their weight in your list. You can use a digital scale or consult the manufacturer’s specifications for each item. Once you have gathered this information, you can create a table to calculate the total weight of your camera setup.

| Equipment | Weight |
|———–|——–|
| Camera Body | 1.5 lbs |
| Lens 1 | 1.7 lbs |
| Lens 2 | 2.2 lbs |
| Flash | 0.8 lbs |
| Battery Grip | 1.0 lbs |
| TOTAL | 8.2 lbs |

In this example, the total weight of the camera setup is 8.2 lbs. You should select a tripod with a weight capacity that is greater than this amount to ensure stability and safety.

When selecting a tripod, it is also important to consider any potential future upgrades to your camera gear. If you plan on adding heavier lenses or accessories in the future, it is recommended to choose a tripod with a weight capacity that exceeds your current needs to provide room for growth.

By taking the time to properly consider the weight of your camera and gear, you can ensure that you select a heavy-duty tripod with the appropriate weight capacity to support your equipment and provide you with a stable base for your photography needs.

Add a safety margin

When determining the weight capacity of a heavy-duty tripod, it’s important to add a safety margin to ensure the stability and safety of your equipment. A safety margin is an extra weight capacity buffer that you add to your tripod’s rated weight capacity, based on your personal preference and level of comfort.

When deciding on how much of a safety margin to add, consider the importance of your equipment as well as the shooting conditions. A good rule of thumb is to add at least 25% to your total weight capacity needed. For instance, if the combined weight of your camera and gear is 10 pounds, it would be recommended to choose a tripod with a weight capacity of at least 12.5 pounds.

It’s better to have a tripod with more weight capacity than you actually need, rather than a tripod that is under-capacity for your gear. Having a tripod that is under-capacity increases the risk of your equipment falling or being damaged.

A carefully calculated safety margin can save you from having to replace your gear due to accidental drop and damage.

Here’s a table that shows some examples of recommended weight capacity and safety margins:

Total Weight Capacity of Camera and Gear Recommended Weight Capacity of Tripod Safety Margin
10 lbs 12.5 lbs 2.5 lbs
20 lbs 25 lbs 5 lbs
30 lbs 37.5 lbs 7.5 lbs

Remember to always consider your gear and shooting conditions when determining your tripod’s weight capacity, and add a safety margin for extra stability and safety.

Choosing a heavy-duty tripod with the right weight capacity

Choosing A Heavy-Duty Tripod With The Right Weight Capacity
When it comes to investing in a heavy-duty tripod, choosing the right weight capacity is crucial for ensuring the stability and safety of your gear. With a variety of factors influencing the weight capacity of a tripod, it can be difficult to determine which one is the best fit for your needs. However, by following a few key considerations and understanding the load capacity vs weight capacity, you can confidently choose a heavy-duty tripod that provides the necessary stability and support for your camera and gear. Let’s explore the important factors to consider when selecting a tripod with the appropriate weight capacity.

Look for the weight capacity rating

When shopping for a heavy-duty tripod, it’s important to look for the weight capacity rating, which indicates the maximum weight that the tripod is capable of supporting. Here are some factors to consider when looking at the weight capacity rating:

  • Don’t underestimate your gear: Make sure that the weight capacity of the tripod is sufficient to support not only your camera and lens, but also any accessories, such as a flash, microphone, or external monitor.
  • Account for future upgrades: If you plan on upgrading your gear in the future, consider investing in a tripod with a higher weight capacity rating to accommodate any additional weight.
  • Factor in safety margin: It’s always better to have extra support rather than not enough. So, when determining the weight capacity you need, add a safety margin of at least 20-30% to ensure that your gear is properly supported.
  • Avoid overloading: While a heavy-duty tripod may have a high weight capacity rating, it’s important to avoid overloading it. Overloading can compromise the stability of the tripod and lead to camera shake and vibrations.

By taking the weight capacity rating into consideration and following these tips, you can choose a heavy-duty tripod that can properly support your gear while providing the stability you need to capture high-quality images and videos.

Check the maximum load capacity of the tripod head

When choosing a heavy-duty tripod, checking the maximum load capacity of the tripod head is crucial for ensuring the stability and safety of your camera and gear. Here are some factors to consider:

  • The type of tripod head: Different types of tripod heads have varying weight capacities, such as ball heads, pan-tilt heads, and gimbal heads. Be sure to choose a tripod head that can support the weight of your gear.
  • The material and construction of the tripod head: Look for a tripod head made of high-quality materials, such as aluminum, magnesium, or carbon fiber, for maximum strength and durability. The construction of the tripod head, such as the number of joints and the weight-bearing design, can also impact its load capacity.
  • The load capacity of the tripod head: This is the maximum weight that the tripod head can support without compromising its stability. Make sure that the load capacity of the tripod head is higher than the combined weight of your camera and heaviest lens.
  • The compatibility of the tripod head: Check that the tripod head is compatible with your camera and any accessories you plan to use, such as a quick-release plate.

Remember to also consider the weight capacity of the tripod legs and center column when choosing a heavy-duty tripod. By checking the load capacity of both the tripod head and the legs, you can ensure that your camera and gear are adequately supported and protected while shooting.

Consider the overall stability of the tripod

When choosing a heavy-duty tripod, overall stability is an extremely important factor to consider. Stability ensures that your tripod can support the weight of your gear without tipping over or wobbling, resulting in sharp and blur-free shots. Here are some elements to consider when examining the stability of a tripod:

  • Leg locking mechanism: Look for a tripod with sturdy and reliable leg locks. Twist locks are generally considered more secure than flip locks.
  • Number of sections: Generally, fewer leg sections provide more stability than more sections because there are fewer joints that could potentially loosen or wobble.
  • Foot design: Rubber feet are typically more stable on smooth surfaces, while spiked feet provide better stability on uneven terrain. Some tripods come with interchangeable feet that can be swapped out depending on the shooting situation.
  • Center column: A center column can provide added height, but it can also compromise stability. Look for a tripod with a reversible center column or one that can be replaced with a shorter column.
  • Weight distribution: Make sure to distribute the weight of your gear evenly across the tripod legs to maintain stability. Avoid placing too much weight on one leg or section of the tripod.

By taking these factors into consideration, you can choose a heavy-duty tripod that offers the stability you need for your photography needs.

Understanding load capacity vs weight capacity

Understanding Load Capacity Vs Weight Capacity
When researching heavy-duty tripods, you may come across the terms “load capacity” and “weight capacity”. While they may appear to be interchangeable, there are actually differences between the two.

Load capacity refers to the maximum weight that a tripod head can support, which includes the weight of the camera and any additional accessories such as lenses or external flashes. This measurement is typically listed in pounds or kilograms on the manufacturer’s specifications.

Weight capacity, on the other hand, refers to the maximum weight that the tripod itself can support, including the weight of the tripod legs, center column, and any attached accessories such as a tripod head.

It’s important to understand the difference between these two terms as they will impact the overall stability and performance of your tripod. If the weight of your camera and accessories exceed the load capacity of the tripod head, you risk damaging your equipment or experiencing camera shake due to instability. On the other hand, if the weight of your gear surpasses the weight capacity of the tripod legs, the tripod may collapse or become unstable, again leading to potential damage or camera shake.

To ensure optimal stability and performance of your tripod, make sure to choose a tripod with a load capacity that matches or exceeds the weight of your camera and accessories, and a weight capacity that exceeds the combined weight of your entire setup. By understanding load capacity and weight capacity, you can make an informed decision when choosing the right heavy-duty tripod for your needs.

Tips for getting the most out of your heavy-duty tripod

Once you have invested in a heavy-duty tripod with the appropriate weight capacity rating, you want to ensure that you are using it to its fullest potential. To do so, there are a few tips you should keep in mind to get the most out of your tripod. These tips include properly distributing the weight of your gear, selecting a level surface for setup, and utilizing stabilizing hooks or weight bags to minimize vibrations and ensure a stable shooting experience. By following these guidelines, you can take full advantage of your heavy-duty tripod and capture high-quality images and videos with ease.

Properly distribute the weight of your gear

When using a heavy-duty tripod, it’s crucial to properly distribute the weight of your gear to ensure both stability and balance. Here are some tips on how to achieve an even distribution of weight:

  • Center the weight: Make sure the weight of your camera and gear is centered over the tripod’s center column. This will help prevent imbalance and ensure stability.
  • Use a tripod head: A tripod head allows you to easily adjust the position of your camera and gear, which can help you achieve proper weight distribution. Make sure to choose a tripod head that can support the weight of your gear.
  • Attach gear to the tripod head: Instead of attaching heavy gear directly to the tripod legs, consider attaching it to the tripod head. This will help distribute weight more evenly and prevent wobbling.
  • Use the tripod’s weight hook: Many heavy-duty tripods have a weight hook located on the underside of the center column. Attaching a weight bag to this hook can help stabilize your tripod in windy conditions and further distribute weight.
  • Adjust tripod legs: Most heavy-duty tripods have adjustable leg angles, which can help you balance your gear on uneven ground. Experiment with adjusting the leg angles and positioning to achieve optimal weight distribution.

By following these tips for properly distributing the weight of your gear, you can ensure your heavy-duty tripod is stable and balanced, which will help prevent camera shake and produce sharper images.

Choose a level surface

One important tip for getting the most out of your heavy-duty tripod is to choose a level surface. When your tripod is set up on an uneven surface, it can affect the stability of your setup and increase the risk of your camera and gear toppling over.

Here are a few things to keep in mind when choosing a level surface for your tripod:

  • Look for a flat surface that can support the weight of your tripod and gear evenly.
  • Avoid sloped or rocky terrain, which can cause your tripod to shift or wobble.
  • If you’re shooting indoors, make sure the floor is level and free of obstacles like cables, rugs, or furniture that could get in the way of your tripod legs.
  • Use a bubble level or electronic level to make sure your tripod’s center column and head are perfectly level.
  • If you’re shooting in a high-wind area, consider using sandbags or other weights to anchor your tripod.

Remember that even the slightest tilt can affect the stability of your setup, so take the time to carefully assess your shooting environment before setting up your tripod. By choosing a level surface, you can ensure that your heavy-duty tripod is able to support your camera and gear safely and securely.

Use a stabilizing hook or weight bag

Keeping your heavy-duty tripod stable is critical for capturing clear, sharp images. However, there may be times when you can’t avoid windy or uneven conditions. In such scenarios, using a stabilizing hook or weight bag can make a significant difference.

A stabilizing hook is a metal hook that attaches to the bottom of your tripod’s center column. You can then hang a weight, such as your camera bag or a sandbag, from the hook. The additional weight helps lower the center of gravity and reduces the chances of the tripod tipping over. Make sure to choose a weight that complements the maximum load capacity of your tripod.

Another option is to use a weight bag. These bags often come filled with sand or other materials and can be attached to the bottom of the center column or the legs of the tripod. They also help to lower the center of gravity and reduce vibrations and camera shake.

Here’s a comparison of the pros and cons of using a stabilizing hook or weight bag:

Stabilizing Hook | Weight Bag
— | —
Attaches to the center column | Can be attached to the center column or legs
Can use a variety of weights | Weight is fixed and can’t be adjusted
Easy to set up and remove | Can be bulky to transport
Can obstruct movement or accessibility | Can be used in tight spaces

Both stabilizing hooks and weight bags can provide extra stability for your heavy-duty tripod. However, it’s important to choose the one that works best for your particular situation. If you need more flexibility in terms of adjusting the weight, a stabilizing hook may be the better option. On the other hand, if you need something that can be attached to the legs or fits in tight spaces, a weight bag may be more suitable.

Conclusion

In conclusion, understanding the weight capacity of heavy-duty tripods is essential for any photographer or videographer looking to capture high-quality images and footage. A tripod’s weight capacity plays a crucial role in not only supporting your camera and gear but also preventing vibrations and camera shake.

Factors such as the material of the tripod legs and center column, the size and thickness of the tripod legs, and the type of tripod head can all affect weight capacity. By determining the weight capacity you need, you can choose a heavy-duty tripod that is right for you and your equipment.

When choosing a tripod, it is important to look for the weight capacity rating and check the maximum load capacity of the tripod head. Additionally, considering the overall stability of the tripod can help ensure a secure and safe setup.

To get the most out of your heavy-duty tripod, proper weight distribution, choosing a level surface, and using a stabilizing hook or weight bag can help prevent unexpected movement and maintain stability during use.

In short, selecting the right heavy-duty tripod with the appropriate weight capacity and taking the proper precautions during setup and use can make all the difference in capturing high-quality images and video.

Frequently Asked Questions

What happens if I exceed the weight capacity of a heavy-duty tripod?

Exceeding the weight capacity can compromise the stability of the tripod, causing it to become unstable and potentially leading to camera and gear damage.

Can I use a lighter camera on a heavy-duty tripod?

Yes, you can use a lighter camera on a heavy-duty tripod, but remember to consider the weight of your heaviest gear for optimal stability.

How important is the weight capacity rating when choosing a tripod?

The weight capacity rating is crucial as it determines the maximum weight the tripod can hold, which affects stability and the risk of camera shake.

Do all tripod heads have weight capacity ratings?

Yes, all tripod heads have weight capacity ratings that should be considered when choosing a tripod and matching it with your gear.

Why is it crucial to properly distribute the weight of your gear on a tripod?

Distributing the weight evenly across the tripod ensures optimal stability and prevents damage to your camera and gear. It also reduces the risk of camera shake and vibrations.

What is the difference between load capacity and weight capacity?

Load capacity typically refers to the weight the tripod head can support, while weight capacity refers to the maximum weight the entire tripod can hold.

What is the impact of material on the weight capacity of a tripod?

The material used for the tripod legs and center column affects weight capacity, with materials such as carbon fiber being both lightweight and strong for maximum weight support.

What should I do if I am uncertain about the weight capacity I need?

Weighing your heaviest gear, considering the weight of your camera and lens, and adding a safety margin can help determine the appropriate weight capacity for your needs.

Can using a stabilizing hook or weight bag help with tripod stability?

Yes, using a stabilizing hook or weight bag is effective in reducing vibrations and increasing stability, especially in windy conditions or when using heavier gear.

What should I look for to ensure overall stability in a heavy-duty tripod?

Thick and sturdy tripod legs, center columns, and tripod heads with weight capacity ratings all contribute to the overall stability of a heavy-duty tripod.

References

Eva Smith
Eva Smith
Vlogger and photographer.
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